Group

Open Source Solutions / Feed

This group is a place to share low-cost, open-source devices for conservation; describe how they are being used, including what needs they are addressing and how they fit in to the wider conservation tech market; identify the obstacles in advancing the capacity of these technologies; and to discuss the future of these solutions - particularly their sustainability and how best to collaborate moving forward.

discussion

Apply to the 2022 GOSH Gathering in Panamá!

The Gathering for Open Science Hardware (GOSH) community is excited to announce that applications to attend the 2022 GOSH Gathering are now open! The Gathering will be held at...

1 0

There are only a few days left to apply to the 2022 Gathering for Open Science Hardware! Join a community of scientists, hardware developers, artists, and activists working together on open hardware for science!

See full post
article

Deep Learning for Marine Ecology and Conservation

arXiv (Journal)
This article provides a review of deep learning (predominantly ML) used in marine ecology and considerations for its future directions in conservation. In plain language, the authors provide a methodology for training...

0
See full post
article

Identification of Wildlife in Camera Trap Images

MDPI (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute - Journal)
Camera trap wildlife surveys can generate vast amounts of imagery. A key problem in the wildlife ecology field is that vast amounts of time is spent reviewing this imagery to identify the species detected. Valuable...

0
See full post
event

How do I get started with OpenCollar Edge Trackers?

Tim van Dam
In this Tech Tutors episode, Tim van Dam, answers the question, How do I get started with OpenCollar Edge Trackers? In this episode, Tim will introduce the OpenCollar edge trackers and give a live demo of how the new...

0
See full post
event

How do I turn a conservation tech project into a product?

Shah Selbe
In this Tech Tutors episode, Shah Selbe answered the question, How do I turn a conservation tech project into a product? In this episode, he discusses how to scale an innovative conservation tech project into a product...

0
See full post
discussion

Volunteer 3D Design Work (Simple) for Your Open Source Project!

Hi Wildlabbers! I've been working on some mentally stressfull 3D modelling this month that's got a whole bunch of parameters and math going on. While I'm in "...

1 0

Amazingly nice offer! Thanks! 

I know how projects can sometimes be stressful. I had a bit of that feeling lately when having to figure out how to code a trap alarm my boss let me spend a lot of money for materials for.

See full post
event

Event: 2021 Open Hardware Summit

Akiba
Join Akiba and Jacinta from WILDLABS' Build Your Own Data Logger course at the virtual 2021 Open Hardware Summit on April 9th!  In their presentation, Akiba and Jacinta will discuss how sharing community knowledge can...

0
See full post
event

Webinar: How can data empower communities in marine management?

WILDLABS Team
Join Blue Ventures' webinar "How can data empower communities in marine management?" this Wednesday 27th January 2021.  09:30-11:15 London | 12:30-14:15 Nairobi |                        16:30-18:15 Jakarta Register here...

0
See full post
discussion

Data standards: How can WILDLABS support?

Hi Wildlabbers WILDLABS has been thinking about data standards practices recently and I wanted to throw a couple questions out to our community: 1) What...

6 0

As someone who has practiced in information technology standards groups and actively worked on data schema standards to facilitate data sharing and even legally valid business transactions (https://www.oasis-open.org/committees/download.php/31222/ENML-1.0-Specification.pdf), my experience indicates it is important that you do the following:

1) Create a small workgroup of the right stakeholders who are committed to the process and results;

2) Pick a schema definition language - JSON or XML - to create the standard (JSON is the flavor of the day, but it is possible to do both with the right commitment);

3) Get people trained on the methodology and grammar for creating the schema;

4) Build the right semantic model up to a level of detail that is feasible for implementation within one year - if you go deeper than that the people who need to get things done in the field will move on while the workgroup will still be arguing details;

5) Build the schema; and

6) Build at least reference tools and applications in at least 2 different programming languages that show the model and schema working.

Without this process, it will be easy to miss the forest by getting lost in the trees (apologies for that).

Arshad

I don't know that it would be possible to create one scheme across all fields and collection tools. I'm involved in a project trying to define shared data standards with 10 private companies in one sector and that's a multi-year discussion. KDEs for seafood traceability (not even a full schema) took 5 years. If by standards you mean general agreements in principles, then maybe working with the ODI would be a good approach (see the work they did on engineering). if you want to get to schemas, maybe check with Matt Jones at NCEAS, bc data science for ecology is his career's work.

Hi skatewing,

I'm not a domain expert like most people in this forum, but I have created XML schemas using object oriented (OO) principles in the past; the same capability exists with JSON schemas.

The important thing is to create a heirarchy of schemas, starting with a generalized schema definition that applies to all participants at the upper layer, and inherit that schema as one starts diving deeper. This permits specialized schemas at lower layers that meets the needs of smaller groups, but as one moves up the schema hierarchy, one finds common parent objects that can be shared with other groups.

If it is impossible to create it in a hierarchy for all group participants, it is possible to start with a smaller general schema that meets everyone's needs and then each specialized group can create independent hierarchies, which can then be linked as necessary (https://json-schema.org/learn/getting-started-step-by-step.html#references)

This capability of inheriting parent schemas, and linking to external schemas, allows simultaneous - yet separate - development by many groups without having to involve everyone all the time. You do need to bring together many people for a short while for the more general parts of the schema at higher levels; but once defined, it can segment out to smaller groups as specialized schema branches/hierarchies are defined.

Arshad

See full post
event

WILDLABS Tech Tutors: Season Two

WILDLABS Team
The WILDLABS Tech Tutors are back! Starting this December, join us for our second season and get even more answers to your biggest "how do I do that?" questions of conservation tech. Whether you're a #tech4wildlife...

0
See full post