Concurrent Butterfly, Bat and Small Mammal Monitoring Programmes Using Citizen Science in Catalonia (NE Spain): A Historical Review and Future Directions

This article brings together the results of four long-term faunal monitoring programmes based on citizen science projects over more than two decades in Catalonia, north east Spain, to examine historical progress and future directions for conservation monitoring. The combination and complementarity of these monitoring programmes provide crucial data to land managers to improve the understanding of conservation needs and develop efficient protection laws. 

Date published: 2021/10/26

Title: Concurrent Butterfly, Bat and Small Mammal Monitoring Programmes Using Citizen Science in Catalonia (NE Spain): A Historical Review and Future Directions

Authors: Ignasi Torre, Adrià López-Baucells, Constantí Stefanescu et. all 

Journal: Diversity MDPI

Citation: Torre, I.; López-Baucells, A.; Stefanescu, C.; Freixas, L.; Flaquer, C.; Bartrina, C.; Coronado, A.; López-Bosch, D.; Mas, M.; Míguez, S.; et al. Concurrent Butterfly, Bat and Small Mammal Monitoring Programmes Using Citizen Science in Catalonia (NE Spain): A Historical Review and Future Directions. Diversity 2021, 13, 454. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13090454 

Open Access: Yes

Abstract:

The Biodiversity and Bioindicators research group (BiBIO), based at the Natural Sciences Museum of Granollers, has coordinated four long-term faunal monitoring programmes based on citizen science over more than two decades in Catalonia (NE Spain). We summarize the historical progress of these programmes, describing their main conservation outputs, the challenges overcome, and future directions. The Catalan Butterfly Monitoring Scheme (CBMS) consists of a network of nearly 200 recording sites where butterfly populations have been monitored through visual censuses along transects for nearly three decades. This programme provides accurate temporal and spatial changes in the abundance of butterflies and relates them to different environmental factors (e.g., habitat and weather conditions). The Bat Monitoring Programme has progressively evolved to include passive acoustic monitoring protocols, as well as bat box-, underground- and river-bat surveys, and community ecological indices have been developed to monitor bat responses at assemblage level to both landscape and climatic changes. The Monitoring of common small mammals in Spain (SEMICE), a common small mammal monitoring programme with almost 80 active live-trapping stations, provides information to estimate population trends and has underlined the relevance of small mammals as both prey (of several predators) and predators (of insect forest pests). The Dormouse Monitoring Programme represents the first monitoring programme in Europe using specific nest boxes for the edible dormouse, providing information about biological and demographic data of the species at the southern limit of its distribution range. The combination and complementarity of these monitoring programmes provide crucial data to land managers to improve the understanding of conservation needs and develop efficient protection laws.

Keywords: bioindicators; volunteers; sampling protocols; species diversity; conservation; population trends

Head over to our open community group dedicated to citizen science to carry on the discussion. 

Continue the discussion… Citizen Science