Group

Camera Traps / Feed

Looking for a place to discuss camera trap troubleshooting, compare models, collaborate with members working with other technologies like machine learning and bioacoustics, or share and exchange data from your camera trap research? Get involved in our Camera Traps group! All are welcome whether you are new to camera trapping, have expertise from the field to share, or are curious about how your skill sets can help those working with camera traps. 

discussion

Wireless Camera for Live Viewing

Hi Everyone, Just thought I'd share a project I'm working on for a cheap remote camera system. The range is short but it connects to a cell phone without needing to...

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Look forward to playing with it when mine arrives I have  a sd card arduino module also not finding much documentation on how to hook it up so was going to play with a server and see what I can do with it and photos 

Nice! I'm building an esp32-cam with a Pi Zero server and I have the photos sending to it now. The last step is to build a housing for it and get it outside to capture some photos of the bears coming out of hibernation. Should be fun! I'm hoping to download photos from the camera over 1km away from my house, while sipping tea haha.

I have a raspberry pi3 setup now as a video streaming server so I can keep a eye on my home while I am at work 

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discussion

Open Source Camera Trap

Hi all new to your site so far a lot of good info from what I see. I have multiple trail cameras some cellular some standard but what I would like to build is a long range WiFi...

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Akiba I have used ubiquiti loco m5 to broadcast internet with great success when I was setting up internet for a park for a 10k run I was able to get atleast a mile with no issues with internet 

not discorcuaged just looking  to piggy back off of a local wifi and be able to connect to a diy camera trap and be able to either do live video feed or capture a pic and then with a program I create send it to email or txt message 

the place I am looking at I can get almost a mile in distance but the problem is the power it would have to be some kind of solar power don't want to have to change batteries ever other day 

Something I'm working on that might work well for you and is super affordable at about $30 per camera.

ESP32-cam (not super high quality photos though) with a motion sensor and it sends the photos to a PI Zero W that can be accesses at any time via wifi. I'm using the TPlink portable but have found that WemosD1 boards and upgrading the firmware to be able to do wifi repeaters works well.

Here's the camera I'm using:

https://starairvision.com/esp32-cam-motion-camera-with-date-and-time/

I'll make a post on here when the full project is built and I've tested the range. The repeaters use something called mesh networking. You can have a number of them in a row to get the camera out into the forest. Or if you have lign of sight you can use a signal booster and or a directional antenna.

Thanks Ryan would like to hear more about this, the project look awesome what distance are you getting from your wifi router 

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discussion

Tech Tutors: How do I start a Tech4Wildlife collaboration?

Hi Wildlabbers, Ed Miller and Melanie Clapham tackled the...

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One barrier that was discussed in the presentation was the "risk" or uncertainty of a payoff when talking to potential funders. It seems to me that the "risk" factor of collaborations like this, for funders, would be analogous to the investment and payoff when developing a genomics program. Relative to traditional field research, it takes a much greater investment in time, with different expertise, to create a reference genome for a species of interest and then pull SNPs, etc. Nevertheless, funders seem to recognize the potential for genomic research and genomic tools. Do you think that greater openness to “risk” in conservation genomics results from closer intellectual proximity (i.e., molecular biology vs organismal biology), or to conservation genomics being a more mature field (i.e., more examples of success), or to other factors? If intellectual proximity is a key factor, then conservation tech collaborations will continue to face this barrier, but if lack of successful examples are a key factor, then perhaps this barrier will become less of an issue for conservation tech in the future. Thoughts?

Hi. Just watched the Youtube version (I'm in the unable to watch live hemisphere) and wanted to say that was a great talk. I wish it could have gone for another hour. I liked hearing about the issues and concerns from Melanie on the biology/ecology side. Also could totally relate to what Ed was talking about from the tech side about how it's difficult to have long term collaborations since there isn't really a conservation technology career path at the moment. 
I think one of the things we're trying to do with courses like Build Your Own Datalogger is to get people involved in wildlife/conservation side more comfortable with the tech. The goal is to hopefully build a shared repository of technical knowledge that people in the wildlife community can contribute to and benefit from. 

Akiba

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article

Protecting Wildlife with Machine Learning

Hack the Poacher
Last year, Tim van Deursen and Thijs Suijten shared their new "Hack the Poacher" system with us, presenting a unique way to detect poachers in real-time within protected national parks. Read on to learn about their next...

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discussion

Recommendations needed: software for collating camera trap images

Just looking for recommendations for collating camera trap images. We will be retrieving 30 cameras in coming weeks and would like to use a program to upload the SD cards directly...

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Hi there!  Have you considered https://www.wildlifeinsights.org/ ? 

It's designed to help field researchers upload and verify their camera trap images quickly using AI. 

It's still at an early stage but at the very least will help you sort through empty images quickly and tag your photos systematically for future AI support.  If you're keen and would like some guidance you can message me directly and I'm happy to help get you connected.  I'm not part of the WI team, but I work alongside folks who do.

Cheers,

Sami

 

The MegaDetector may be of use to you. @sarabeery would be a good resource! 

https://github.com/microsoft/CameraTraps/blob/master/megadetector.md

https://colab.research.google.com/github/microsoft/CameraTraps/blob/master/detection/megadetector_colab.ipynb?fbclid=IwAR24wafHhHDDdt503pBISsl184vuNYlbo6K7WaqpdLJyonhMja6nQJGRcsE

https://github.com/microsoft/cameratraps

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event

Making the Most of Tech Tutors Season 2!

WILDLABS Team
WILDLABS is celebrating its five year anniversary! Throughout the rest of 2020, we'll be sharing articles, community features, and case studies showcasing the incredible projects, collaborations, and successes that this...

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discussion

Tech Tutors: How do I repair my camera traps?

Hi Wildlabbers,  It's almost time for our fifth Tech Tutors session tomorrow with Laure Joanny, Rob Appleby, and Alistair Stewart, who will...

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Hi all,

I know we mentioned this in the episode and collaborative doc for this episode, but I just wanted to make sure everyone knows about the camera trap troubleshooting spreadsheet our presenters created! The goal is to build up a bank of common problems so we can help each other and have an ongoing resource to use.

Please consider adding your problems into the spreadsheet as well as here in the forum!

-Ellie

Hi all,

This camera trap repair video about sulfated batteries was shared with us on Twitter and I thought it might be interesting and helpful for this Tech Tutors group! Check it out here and let us know if you find this useful!

-Ellie 

 

Hi all, 

Just saw this on Twitter - a database of all kinds of camera trap user manuals across brands and models. Thought it might be a helpful resource if you're struggling with an old or used camera that you don't have the manual for.

------

 

Did you buy your #cameratrap years ago and you have lost the user manual?

that's my case, but I've the solution!

find here thousand of #cameratrap user manual. Different brands, models...https://t.co/c9FchfINzR

— cameratraps (@cameratraps1) November 3, 2020
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discussion

Camera trap repairs

Hi all, thank you for the fascinating camera trap workshop, I found it super helpful in my battle against camera trap repairs. I am currently at a research station in the...

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Apologies for the super late reply and thank you for all your comments and help. WE had wifi problems at the research station. I managed to fix a few by removing the rust from connectors, leaving them in a sealed container with silica gel. I am not back at home so will look at the different documents and order some equipment before I go back out to be ready for more repairing. Is there a list of other suggested items I should invest in to help with repairs? 

That is great to hear, Mark. I'm interested as to which repair related to each of the symptoms you intially listed, but for now, knowing that more of your cameras work is excellent. I think your use of silica gel to properly dry out the cameras is underrated - this might have to top suggestion for malfunctioning cameras in the future.

A list of basic tools is a good idea. Maybe we should start a separate thread for this, but I'll throw a few in here to start.

Screwdriver set  - small electronics screwdrivers, Phillips and flat head. Some cameras are using "torx" heads, so check your equipment and what you may need.

Multimeter - most problems can be checked using a volt meter only, but checking resistance of leads and continuity is very useful.

Pliers and snips - small needle nosed pliers are great for hard to reach pieces, side cutters help a lot for accurately trimming wires. If you start rewiring and soldering then wire strippers are very useful, but the job can be done carefully with a sharp knife if needed.

Soldering iron, solder and flux - if parts are coming loose, cables are getting torn off by animals or you just need to secure old wires better, then soldering is usually needed. A cheap soldering iron will do the job on wires for batteries and general hookup, but fine temperature control and a small tip is better for circuitboards. Do you have mains power - 240V/110V? A battery powered or 12V iron might be needed for a remote field/station. Fine electronics solder is most useful. Flux help clean surfaces for soldering but should be rinsed off to avoid corrosion - I have a "flux pen" that is small, portable. Practice is the key to soldering. There are lots of tutorials online about soldering but give it a go on something sacrificial first to get a feel for temperatures and how molten solder works.

Spare wire - size the wire accoring to the amperage that is needed. Passing too many amps through a fine wire may cause a fire (trust me). Multiple colours are avaialble so you can colour code your +/- and data lines. 

Insulation - this should be higher up the list! Electrical tape wrapped around wires and terminals will get the job done, but heat shrink tube in various sizes is more robust (just remember to put it over the wire before you connect it). Kapton tape is good for covering flat, internal electronics like circuitboards.

I hope that helps. Any other suggestions?

Cheers, Al

I also just found this similar summary of equipment on youtube - https://youtu.be/pNBkfE8UPDI. The breadboard and components are a good addition for building and testing circuits.

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event

Snapshot USA Symposium for Student Research

Roland Kays
Are you a student using Snapshot USA data in research and class projects? Present your work (and Mammal Memes) at the Snapshot USA Student Research Symposium! Taking place on November 13th from 1-3 PM EST, this is your...

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discussion

Tech Tutors: How do I train my first machine learning model?

Hi wildlabbers,  We're just a few hours away from our first Tech Tutors session with Daniel Situnayake, who will be tackling the question: ...

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Hi Wildlabbers,

Just popping in to share this very cool primer for beginners to embedded machine learning from our tutor Daniel Situnayake! If you're interested in learning more about the basics of TinyML, this is a great resource.

Find the link here!

-Ellie

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event

Training Opportunity: HarvardX TinyML Course

edX
Want to build your professional skills in TinyML? Harvard University and Google TensorFlow are offering a new online Professional Certificate program of 3 skill-building courses, designed to cover the essential "...

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discussion

Model Question: Bushnell Trophy Cam HD Low-Glow 119719CW

Hello! I hope everyone is safe and well so far during this pandemic. I was just wondering if anyone knows if Bushnell Trophy Cam HD Low-Glow 119719CW can record in hybrid...

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Hi

I don´t know about that specific model number, but all "modern" Bushnell's I've seen had that option. But have in mind that after the picture the camera needs some time to start the video, sometimes up to 9 seconds, which for many animals might be excesive. In my case working with carnivores in the high Andes, we missed most of the videos.

Maybe they improve on this, the experience I'm mentioning was with a model bought two years ago named Bushnell Trophy Cam Aggressor (Low-Glow), 36 LEDs 14MP (I don't know the model number).

 

I hope it helps.

Bests

Hi Juan, 

Thank you for your reply. Finger cross that the model we are buying can operate in hybrid mode. We currently use Trophy Cam Agressor 119776 and 119774, and both can shoot in hybrid mode. I can actually find a manual for these two models to confirm this functionality.

And good to know about the delay. We've been quite lucky thus far with the two models above. Typically, I notice the lag hovers around 1 sec only. 

Have a nice day!

Best wishes,

Just in case anyone out there who's wondering the same as I did. I finally have this specific model in hand, and no it doesn't record in hybrid mode. 

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event

Webinar: Advances in Fisheries Electronic Monitoring

SAFET
2020 Seafood and Fisheries Emerging Technology Conference kicks off their webinar series this Thursday, Sept. 24th at 5 PM PT/ 8 PM ET. Register now for New Models, New Applications: Advances in Fisheries Electronic...

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article

Meet the Scientists of Black Mammalogists Week!

Black Mammalogists Week
To celebrate the first Black Mammalogists Week (starting Sunday, September 13th), we talked to four of the amazing Black scientists behind this event! Find out what they had to say about their favorite (and most...

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event

Tech Tutors: Review Session

WILDLABS Team
Missing Tech Tutors? Us too! Catch up on every episode from Season 1, check out some of our community highlights, and find out what we loved most about launching this series in this mid-week Tech Tutors review session....

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discussion

Stereoscopic Camera Project

Intro Hi all!  It was suggested to me to post up on here about a stereoscopic camera project I'm working on, as I want to see if there's any way I...

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Should have posted this up first, but here's an earlier case prototype that I quickly put together to test its durability outside in the elements.  It worked quite well, even when raining.  Always save your old compost bags, very useful for waterproofing things (unless they have those tiny holes in!)

This is awesome, Tom! I think it would definitely be really helpful for individual identification of animals, as the 3D would give you a better perspective on distinctive markings, coloration, size, etc.

Thanks Carly!  I was thinking similar things, you can identify shape a lot better when you see an object with depth rather than without.

The two cameras can be configured to be a long distance apart or closer together too which means animals right up close or really far away can be identified easier.  It also means that you can have the vision of a mouse or an elephant .. or a lemur! 

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article

Designing a Camera Mount with FLIR and WWF

Ashley Rosen
Today, WWF conservation engineering intern Ashley Rosen shares insight into the process of redesigning a camera mount for FLIR thermal cameras used by rangers in the fight against poaching. Ashley's design will become a...

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article

Laure Joanny Reviews: Tech Tutors' How Do I Repair My Camera Traps?

Laure Joanny
Our first season of Tech Tutors may have wrapped, but the connections and collaborations from these episodes are still going strong! Today, we're sharing Tech Tutor presenter Laure Joanny's recap of the most important...

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I think you are right that there can be a lot of sharing on fixing camera traps! However, instead of setting up infrastructure for repair instructions, why not use an existing one...
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article

Metal Detecting Sensors for Anti-Poaching

Sam Seccombe
Since 2016, ZSL’s Instant Detect team have been working on improving metal detecting sensors for anti-poaching. The team believe that using metal detecting sensors will provide a highly targeted detection of potential...

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discussion

Model Question: CT Detection angle and Field of View

Hello, I'm currently working on estimating the density of bezoar goats in Iraqi Kurdistan using REM. My data consists of camera trap images over a seven-year period. The...

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Hi Hana,

https://www.trailcampro.com/pages/trail-camera-detection-field-of-view-angle

https://www.trailcampro.com/pages/how-why-we-test-trail-cameras

Trailcamerpro.com have the above details. They measure field of view with a ruler at a set distance and some maths. Detection angle is harder and one way is to do a slow walk test, a foot every 20 seconds, across the cameras view and work out where the camera first captures images and then map this back to the field of view.

Hope this helps,

Sam

  

Hi Hana, I know for Bushnell the manual has the FOV, it should be 50 degrees for yours. All the manuals are online so you just have to find your model. https://www.bushnell.com/bu-manuals.html 

As for the detection radius I agree with looking at trailcampro, to see if they've tested your model.

 

Fig 2 here; https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/aje.12573 might help for the Bushnell. I haven't tested Stealthcams. 

There is more here; https://www.researchgate.net/project/A-realistic-reproducible-and-rigorous-test-for-wildlife-camera-trap-performance

 

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event

Event: StreamingScience's #Tech4Wildlife Thursdays

StreamingScience
Join Conservation Technology Educator Andrew Schulz each Thursday at 7:00pm EST for #Tech4Wildlife Thursdays, a casual chat event with friends from the conservation tech community. Many of these chats will feature...

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article

BearID To Go

BearID Project
In this article from BearID Project, Director and Software Developer Ed Miller walks us through using their application to identify individual bears from photographs. Ed shows us how to easily use BearID remotely in the...

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