Group

Acoustic Monitoring / Feed

Bioacoustic monitoring is one of our biggest and most active groups, with members collecting and analysing acoustic data from every type of wildlife, from birds and bats to big cats, and even reptiles!

discussion

Recommendations for a waterproof microphone for bats and birds?

Hey all. I'm drawing up the specs for an at-sea recorder, geared towards recording migratory bats and birds. We're going to likely be using some of the Wildlife Acoustics...

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I didn't see this post until the digest came out, but if you still need some comments...

I suggest asking this question on one of the sound recordists forums.  The people on [email protected] are generally quite knowledgeable on microphones and protecting them...and quite friendly :)   Ivano Pelicella (Dodotronics) monitors that forum and will happy to chime in if you have a question on their mics.  Or you can email him.

Regarding the Momimic...it uses the Knowles FG23629, but I see what you mean about the lack of much specs.  This is their datasheet, if you don't have it - https://www.digikey.com/en/products/detail/knowles/FG-23629-D65/810005

The Momimic seems like a good choice for what you described and it's off the shelf, although I haven't used it personally.  Maybe email Ivano for some help.

Good luck!  I hope you will be posting your progress and results!

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discussion

Reducing wind noise in AudioMoth recordings

Hi everyone. I'm wondering if anyone has tips for reducing wind noise in AudioMoth recordings. Our study sites are open paddocks and can be subject to high wind. Many...

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Hi Daniella,

I don't know specifically about AudioMoth, but people have had very good results reducing or eliminating wind noice on things like GoPros or iPhones, etc. using simple Microphone Windscreen foam.  You can buy ones for headsets and the like pretty cheap (10 for $1 for the little ones).  You can just cut them up and either tape them in place on the inside of the case or rubber band them on the outside.  

Also, if the sounds you are trying to extract are still audible, but hard to pull out of the noise, you might also be able to post-process the wind noise out.  Wind tends to be heavy in low frequencies, so depending on what you are looking for you might be able to just filter the lower frequencies out, or use an open source tool like Audacity.  But if your signal is buried deep within the noise, these tools might also corrupt your target signal.

Hope this helps.

Drue

I second what Drue said on both fronts. Using a windscreen for any microphone is really helpful in reducing wind interference. For the Audiomoth's size, you could probably use a lavalier mic windscreen of some sort inside your case. I post-process wind interference out sometimes using bandpass filters in RavenPro (cutting out low frequencies <1kHz usually gets most of it at the site I work at) but this will depend on the frequencies of your target sounds. 

furry "dead cat" covers and blimps work best for cutting down wind noise, and a very good spectral noise repair tool, though it's paid, iZotope RX8. There is a de-wind module, but you can also teach it what to repair. I believe Davinci Resolve and Adobe Audition might also have wind reduction tools, but my go-to is iZotope RX8. 

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article

New Papers: Remote Sensing in Ecology and Conservation

Remote Sensing in Ecology & Conservation
ZSL's Remote Sensing in Ecology and Conservation journal  has released new research for early view before inclusion in an issue. See the full list of recent open access research papers on RSEC.

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event

Webinar: Mission Possible: Deployment

Wildlife Acoustics
Join Wildlife Acoustics for a free webinar, "Misson Possible: Deployment," on May 13th from 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM US EDT/ 3:00 PM -7:00 PM BST. This webinar's expert panel will focus on deployment methods, procedures, and...

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event

Webinar: Acoustic Tag Technologies and Applications

The Discovery of Sound in the Sea
Join the DOSITS 2021 Webinar Series on Friday, May 7, 2021 12:00 PM ET for their upcoming session, "Acoustic Tag Technologies and Applications." This webinar will feature presentations from two marine bioacoustics...

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event

BirdCLEF 2021 Kaggle Challenge

The Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Join the BirdCLEF 2021 Kaggle challenge, where you’ll automate the acoustic identification of birds in soundscape recordings. You'll examine an acoustic dataset to build detectors and classifiers to extract the signals...

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discussion

Webinar Series

Hi all, The UK Acoustics Network's Bioacoustics special interest group is hosting a monthly webinar series starting this month (April) with talks on ecoacoustics, ...

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discussion

Organize audio files by frequency

Hi! I hope everyone is doing well. I am new to acoustic tracking and I have recently set out an audio recorder to record bird sounds and I now have 100s of files of 10-...

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This may not be immediately useful, but I really like this interactive visualisation of bird calls organised by similarity (requires a desktop browser to run the experiment): 

https://experiments.withgoogle.com/bird-sounds

They do provide the source code so it may be possible recreate this with your data, but it does seem daunting. One thing to note with these similarity measurements is the pattern or clustering is dependent on the input data. The outcome of this is you may end up with a very different order and pattern with only a sligltyly different set of input data.

 

As Carlos mentioned, the R packages would be good if you're just looking for summary stats averaged over the whole 10s of the fiie. You would just read that directory into R and load seewave, tuneR, warbleR (I think monitoR may also have this functionality). Perhaps helpful links - 

seewave - http://rug.mnhn.fr/seewave/

tuner - https://rdrr.io/rforge/tuneR/

warbler - https://marce10.github.io/warbleR/

 

I'm assuming that by "sort by frequencies" you mean the frequency of the call itself, not the frequency of the audio recording (for example, a call at 1KHz vs a recording at a sample rate of 48KHz). My recommendation would be to use R (seewave/tuneR) to generate mean spectra of the recordings (meanspec function) and you can then use those mean spectra to figure out the peak frequency range and sort by that.

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article

Survey Invite: Open-source acoustic monitoring technology

University of Melbourne
The University of Melbourne and Open Acoustic Devices  are conducting an online survey to understand the future needs of open-source acoustic monitoring technology applied to the study of biodiversity. The results of...

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discussion

Take the survey: your needs and priorities for (open-source) acoustic monitoring technology

Hi everyone, Experienced or a newbie with acoustic monitoring? Doesn’t matter, we want to hear from you! We want to know your wish list for acoustic monitoring technology....

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Hey everyone, only 5 DAYS LEFT to take the survey! We’re just short of 100 respondents now, and would be great to get as much coverage as possible! Please consider responding if you haven’t done so already, and spread to your contacts who might be interested.

Responses so far show a clear support for the open-source option for acoustic monitoring technology. Almost 70% would be willing to spend time or resources to learn (or have someone in their team learning) the skills that allow you to customise open-source acoustic devices. More than half thought it would be useful to have a “developer version” of an acoustic device (that you can tinker with, and integrate/connect to other devices).

Please contribute your thoughts to help the acoustic community design the open-source monitoring technology of the future!

Hi everyone, we’ve decided to extend the survey for 3 more weeks, until the 18th of April!

That will be the final date (the online survey tool we use is not free, and we’ve got budget limitations :-)

We’re now over 100 respondents from all continents, but we do have significant gaps (e.g. SE Asia and China, many parts of Africa) which we would love to cover. There is also a slight bias towards terrestrial acoustics (only 18% report working in aquatic habitats), but this might just reflect the number of people working in terrestrial vs aquatic acoustics generally. In any case, would also love to get more respondents from the wet side of life. Please participate and spread to your contacts.

And big thanks to those of you who’ve already participated!!

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discussion

Advice on a Master's project

Hi all, I’m posting here to ask for a some advice. Sorry in advance for the long post. I’m currently studying for an integrated masters in Electrical and...

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Yes. The key output for synchronisation is the pulse per second (PPS) output which is synchronised very accurately to UTC. The TX from the GPS module is then useful for reading the time and positions. You generally don't need to be able to send commands to the module as most of the time the default settings are fine.

Yes. The key output for synchronisation is the pulse per second (PPS) output which is synchronised very accurately to UTC. The TX from the GPS module is then useful for reading the time and positions. You generally don't need to be able to send commands to the module as most of the time the default settings are fine.

Hi Harry (and all)

Just wanted to share some potentially relevant papers that I've come across, in case you haven't found them already. Coming more from the ecology/conservation focused side of conservation tech, but potentially of use to see what's actually been deployed out there! 

Yip, D. A., Knight, E. C., Haave‐Audet, E., Wilson, S. J., Charchuk, C., Scott, C. D., ... & Bayne, E. M. (2020). Sound level measurements from audio recordings provide objective distance estimates for distance sampling wildlife populations. Remote Sensing in Ecology and Conservation, 6(3), 301-315. https://zslpublications.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdfdirect/10.1002/rse2.118.

Abadi, S. H., Wacker, D. W., Newton, J. G., & Flett, D. (2019). Acoustic localization of crows in pre-roost aggregations. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 146(6), 4664-4671. https://asa.scitation.org/doi/full/10.1121/1.5138133.

Spillmann, B., van Noordwijk, M. A., Willems, E. P., Mitra Setia, T., Wipfli, U., & van Schaik, C. P. (2015). Validation of an acoustic location system to monitor Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus wurmbii) long calls. American Journal of Primatology, 77(7), 767-776. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajp.22398.

Kershenbaum, A., Owens, J. L., & Waller, S. (2019). Tracking cryptic animals using acoustic multilateration: A system for long-range wolf detection. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 145(3), 1619-1628. https://doi.org/10.1121/1.5092973.

Stinco, P., Tesei, A., Dreo, R., & Micheli, M. (2021). Detection of envelope modulation and direction of arrival estimation of multiple noise sources with an acoustic vector sensor. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 149(3), 1596-1608. https://doi.org/10.1121/10.0003628. 

Rhinehart, T. A., Chronister, L. M., Devlin, T., & Kitzes, J. (2020). Acoustic localization of terrestrial wildlife: Current practices and future opportunities. Ecology and Evolution, 10(13), 6794-6818. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ece3.6216.

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funding

Funding Opportunity: COVID-19 Science Fund

National Geographic
National Geographic is offering funding up to up to $50,000 for conservationists conducting research on how the pandemic has impacted wildlife and conservation work.  If you are interested in researching aspects of the...

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discussion

Sound library for small terrestrial mammals

Accompanying an article in British Wildlife describing the sound identification of small terrestrial mammals in the UK, colleagues and I at the BTO have put together a sound...

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Stuart, that is really cool! Are these clips translated into audible frequency range?

Hi Phil, the playable spectrograms have been translated into the audible frequency range (by playing in 10 x time expansion), becuase the small mammal calls are mainly above our hearing range, but a copy of the original wav files can be downloaded from the web site.

 

Ah, perfect. I was wondering why I never hear those calls!

That's really nice work, thanks so much for sharing!

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event

How do I strategically allocate drones for conservation?

WILDLABS Team
Our tenth and final Tech Tutor of Season 2 is Harvard University PhD candidate, Elizabeth Bondi, who tackled the question, "How do I strategically allocate drones for conservation?". Watch it on the WILDLABS Youtube...

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discussion

Audiomoth and Natterjack Monitoring (UK)

Is anyone aware of anything that has been published, or anyone who is using Audiomoth (or similar) to monitor Natterjack toad calling at night? Or using it to monitor any night-...

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Hi Sarah, I'm curently working on the sound identification of native and introduced frogs in the UK. I need another season of recordings, and a lot more recordings of Natterjack's, but my aim is to build these into the BTO Acoustic Pipeline  hopefully later this year - alongside bats, small mammals, bush-crickets etc to also identify these automatically when they are recorded as 'by-catch.' https://www.bto.org/pipeline. 

Hi Alex, I'm not sure what problems there could be with aliasiing and harmonics using a low sample rate, and may depend I guess on how the recordings are processed later on, but I've enclosed a spectrogram of a typical recording below, and can send you some example recordings if useful. Perhaps to use a sample rate of about 10 kHz.., but it's not something that I think about - I always use an excessive sample rate (24 kHz for anurans).

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discussion

EarthHz tool

Awesome tools are out there for bioacoustic monitoring - so jazzed about the growing acoustic community! Here's another one the Songs of Adaptation project...

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discussion

warbleR / R packages for bioacoustics forum

Hi all I have a few questions regarding R and bioacoustics packages, their usage and so on. (for example, can you add an existing Wave object to a warbleR selection table?)...

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Hi all! 

Just as a general resource, @tessa.rhinehart has a really awesome table of different bioacoustic software and R packages with their varied functionality: https://github.com/rhine3/audiomoth-guide/blob/master/resources/analysis-software.md.

I haven't worked with warbleR directly, but I've played around in monitoR and gibbonR for passive acoustic monitoring analyses. 

You might also just reach out to Marcelo (writer of the package) and ask directly...

Happy coding!

Carly

I used the package soundecology in R: URL: http://ljvillanueva.github.io/soundecology/ and  https://cran.r-project.org/package=soundecology 

This package helps to calculate several acoustic index using .WAV files. Is possible to analyses several files as same time.

Best regards!

Hi all thanks for the answers!

Carly - thanks, will have to try yours. I did the course at the Organisation of Tropical Studies with Marcelo, which was awesome, but this is not something he's keen on answering, I think he has other ways of doing it. Sorting it out on Github atm. Hope your moving terabytes of data is going well :)

domingos - thank you, I do know about this one, but having a selection table in warbleR opens up to a lot of various other options that can be really useful. Will keep you updated.

Thanks

Axel

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event

Workshop: Analyses of acoustic telemetry data with R

European Tracking Network
Join the European Tracking Network on January 18th 2021 at 2 PM Central European Time (1 PM GMT) for a free workshop on standardized analyses of acoustic telemetry data using the R packages actel and RSP!  The actel...

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discussion

Analyzing sounds of flying insects

Dear all, I have a short question with the hope of getting back long answers: Is anyone working in the field of detecting and analyzing sounds of flying insects (e.g. flies...

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this guys has been around a long and has some neat stuff http://songsofinsects.com/about

but sure looks like a wide-open area of research ...

Tom Dally at Leeds University UK is doing work in this area. I dont think he has anything published yet but his preliminary results are interesting (saw them at a workshop).

https://biologicalsciences.leeds.ac.uk/school-of-biology/pgr/753/thomas-dally 

Tom

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discussion

Tech Tutors: How do I use pattern matching analysis to label acoustic data with RFCxArbimon?

Hi Wildlabbers, Tech Tech Tutors Season 2 continues with our third epsiode, featuring Rainforest Connection's Zephyr Gold & Marconi Campos Cerqueira‬, who tackled...

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Thanks everybody for joining today's session! I've attached the article here that describes Pattern Matching in greater detail to respond to some of the questions from today's session. 
Also, here is a link to our Privacy Policy and our Terms of Service for the individual who had questions about GDPR. Feel free to contact us at [email protected] with any other questions about the platform or Pattern Matching in general! 

Zephyr and Marconi, thanks for the great talk and your hard work that made this platform available to the public!! I'm experimenting with the pattern matching function to create some training data but have issues trying to get the "Jobs'' to run. I only have 18 files for each of these tests, but only 1 processed to 11.1% while two others stay at 0%. The internet connection was briefly interrupted when I created the first job and was fine later on. I can only Hide, not delete or re-run these jobs, so I'm not sure what to do. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks so much!

Hi @pmnguyen1224 , thanks for reaching out and checking out the system! We would love to help ensure that you're able to get pattern matching to work for you! I do have a few questions for you so we can replicate issue you are experiencing. Would you mind emailing us a couple screenshots and your original message above at [email protected] to get started? Or feel free to send us a chat if that's easier, by clicking on the chat icon on https://arbimon.rfcx.org/. Looking forward to supporting you moving forward!

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article

FIS Call for Expressions of Interest (closed)

Fisheries Innovation Scotland
WILDLABS community members are invited to submit an Expression of Interest to Fisheries Innovation Scotland (FIS) to participate in two research projects involving conservation tech's role in the future of sustainable...

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discussion

Calling all hydrophone users: Tell us what you want!

Who are we? We are Open Acoustic Devices, makers of the AudioMoth. AudioMoth is a low-cost, open-source acoustic monitoring device widely used for terrestrial...

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I’ll stick some thoughts here that other folk can maybe comment on/add to. 

 

So there are a few (obvious) differences between terrestrial and marine acoustics. 

  • Devices are immersed in a highly corrosive and conductive liquid (sea water) with strong underwater currents, fishermen, storms etc. 
  • Boat’s are usually required to deploy devices - that can mean it is much more expensive to make recordings. 
  • Ultra high frequency species and noise sources (e.g. harbour porpoise @130kHz and broadband delphinid clicks @ >200kHz and echo sounders @ 200kHz) are relatively common. 

For PAM devices that means a few things: 

  • Longevity is crucial because it can greatly decrease the cost per hour of recordings (less boat time is required). There are a few strategies for maximising this;
  1. Devices such as FPODs and SoundTraps run onboard detectors. The SoundTrap in particular can run a click detector at high frequency (up to 576khz sample rate) whilst also contiously recording at lower sample rates.  This means that it detects high frequency delphinid and porpoise clicks (and saves the waveform for further analysis) and at the same time records all lower frequency sounds where almost all of the complex tonal vocalisations of dolphins, baleen whales and anthropogenic sounds occur; these types of sounds also happen to be more difficult to accurately automatically detect (especially on low powered hardware). This strategy results in an order of magnitude reduction in data without incurring a large cost in data degradation. 
  2. Run on board compression algorithms - the SoundTrap uses an open source X3 compression algorithm that often results in four times lossless data compression. 
  3. Have the space for a lot of batteries and/or the option of an external battery pack. 
  • Sensitivity is important because you want to maximise your monitored area (again making your survey as efficient as possible). That means choosing a hydrophone, amplifier and DAQ with a low noise floor and appropriate clip level. 
  • Devices must be robust and waterproof. They should be able to survive biofouling, getting knocked on the seabed and ending up in a fishing net etc. The two common housing designs are to have a completely sealed unit with an underwater connector (often SubConn) for downloading data or having a unit which can be opened to remove memory cards and batteries. Both approaches have their advantages and failure points. For example, devices which are sealed tend to be more simple to set up but the connector is often a failure point. Devices which can be opened are serviceable at sea but they can flood and are air filled which makes them a bigger acoustic target for echolocators (and so can mess up results). 

There are also a few ‘nice to have’ options. 

  • Two sample synchronised hydrophones allowing a bearing to be calculated. This can be useful for a whole host of stuff - for example using bearing tracks to figure out how many animals might be present, improving density estimation methods and allowing an extra data dimension for classification algorithms. It also means the devices are useful for a host of other applications - e.g. towed hydrophone surveys. 
  • Depth, temperature, tilt and light sensors are inexpensive low power and produce only a few gigabytes (at the very most) of data over a survey but can provide a wealth of oceanographic data that is also helpful in acoustic monitoring. 
  • If running detectors, then recording noise is critical because it allows us to model changes in the probability of detecting animals which is often important in density estimation. 
  • Accurate clocks are useful. The  SoundTrap clock drifts around 2s per day. Although manageable, this is often a pain and consumes valuable analysis time re-syncing devices together. 
  • The ability to daisy chain devices so they can be sample synchronised and used in acoustic arrays is very handy. For example SoundTraps have been used to make large aperture hydrophone arrays to localise Kogia. DOI: 10.1016/j.dsr.2020.103233 (if achievable this may supersede point 1. )

Ok, that’s everything I can think of for now. I would be keen to hear other opinions on this, additions, disagreements etc.  Jamie





 

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event

Making the Most of Tech Tutors Season 2!

WILDLABS Team
WILDLABS is celebrating its five year anniversary! Throughout the rest of 2020, we'll be sharing articles, community features, and case studies showcasing the incredible projects, collaborations, and successes that this...

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event

WILDLABS Tech Tutors: Season Two

WILDLABS Team
The WILDLABS Tech Tutors are back! Starting this December, join us for our second season and get even more answers to your biggest "how do I do that?" questions of conservation tech. Whether you're a #tech4wildlife...

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funding

Kaggle Competition: Species Audio Detection

Rainforest Connection
Hey Acoustic Monitoring and AI for Conservation community members - don't miss Rainforest Connection's Species Auto Detection Kaggle competition, open for to competitors and teams now! Participants will have the chance...

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event

Weekly Event: OTN Virtual Study Hall

Ocean Tracking Network
Do you track ocean species and want to meet others who are working together to solve marine conservation's big issues with telemetry? Join the Ocean Tracking Network's weekly Virtual Study Halls, taking place every...

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article

Hackathon Opportunity: Vaquita Hacks

The Conservation Project International
Do you have innovative #tech4wildlife ideas that could save one of the most endangered species on earth from extinction? Apply now to join Vaquita Hack, a hackathon for students and early career conservationists!  This...

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